Local Character Area 07: Caterham East -Wooded Caterham Valley including Harestone.

View of verdant backdrop

For this Character Area refer to:

  • Tandridge District Council. (2011). Harestone Valley Character Assessment
  • Tandridge District Council. (2011). Harestone Valley Design Guidance

 This area is an Area of Special Residential Character (Harestone Valley) and TDC has recognised the particular significance of this area within the Local Plan, having published an assessment of its key characteristics and separate design guidance to safeguard them in March 2011.

View from Tupwood Lane
  • Proposals which demonstrate that existing trees which preserve the rural setting are retained and protected are more likely to be acceptable.
  • Design proposals for new developments should be in keeping with the existing size, scale, height of the existing dwellings of surrounding settlement.
  • Design proposals for developments within the rural areas should preserve the remote rural character, be well set back from the roads with sympathetic and in keeping boundary treatments, be bespoke in design and each plot should be developed on its own to preserve the heterogynous nature of the architecture within the areas.
  • Development should protect and enhance existing belts of woodland and incorporate new planting to further enhance the quality and biodiversity of the area.
  • Enhance strategic walking and cycling opportunities including the North Downs Way connecting the character area, to the AONB and beyond.
  • The character management principles relate to the LCA’s characteristic low-density development within a wooded setting. The issues of the NCA are primarily the developments which disrupt the woodland setting, and the threats are developments which might reduce the wooded area or sick out from it.
  • Preserve the tree lined ridges.
  • Developments near ridgelines should be enclosed by woodland to maintain views of the continuous wooded ridgeline.
  • Developments should minimise the loss of existing trees and include tree planting to minimise its visual impact on its immediate surroundings and from the opposing valley side or higher points in the valley.
  • In areas where there is an existing pattern of built form, new development should relate positively to this, for instance, the distance built-form is set back from the road.
  • New developments should respond to the topography: they should sit bellow the surrounding tree line, even when located lower in the valley to preserve the overall verdant character of the area.
  • New developments should respond to the topography: they should sit bellow the surrounding tree line, even when located lower in the valley to preserve the overall verdant character of the area.
  • Development should be staggered up the slopes and not reach to ridgeline in order to preserve the wooded skyline; .
  • Development should roughly follow the contours in the flatter areas to be consistent with existing built development layout and its relationship with the topography.
  • Built form should be in keeping in the level of intricacy used in architectural detailing and employ a sympathetic materials pallet typical of the vernacular seen in other buildings in the area.
  • New development on main roads should be set back from the road and be low density to conserve the prevailing character.
  • Planting should be a key element of new development, with green boundaries, palisade fencing, railings or walls constructed from the exiting palette of vernacular materials seen as preferable to panelled timber fencing or modern materials which are atypical of the area.
  • Driveways should be designed to minimise the loss of green space in street facing aspects

 

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